Getting ready for Parallel London 2017

Parallel London preparation

I’m very excited as Wild Happy Well’s first event is approaching! I’m taking part in Parallel London 2017 volunteering for Joanna Grace’s The Sensory Projects, so my Parallel London preparation is now in full swing! The Sensory Projects combine all of Joanna’s activities in creating sensory stories, books, structured sensory art, providing training, and more. They are “run on the principle that with the right knowledge and a little creativity inexpensive items can become effective sensory tools for inclusion” and this is at the heart of what we will be doing at Parallel London. Joanna has been working with the creators of Parallel London to provide sensory experiences that are inclusive to everyone and includes the Super Sensory 1km, a multi-sensory course. This year, she is running a sensory tent with activities designed specifically to stimulate each of the senses, and together with other like-minded folk, we’ll be providing a buffet of sensory delights!

The Sensory Project Tent

The Sensory Tent at Parallel London will contain a variety of tables, one for each of the seven sensory systems that The Sensory Projects works with, with activities and challenges for participants to engage with:

  1. Vision (sight)
  2. Olfaction (smell)
  3. Gustation (taste)
  4. Auditory sense (hearing)
  5. Touch
  6. Proprioception (perception of body position, position of body parts relative to one another)
  7. Vestibular sense (balance, spatial awareness)

Wild Happy Well table

Wild Happy Well is delighted to hosting the Olfactory Sense table: I’ll be providing natural olfactory delights to tickle your nostrils and challenge your connection with plants (it won’t be very difficult I promise – it’s meant to be fun after all!). The WHW activities will be specifically designed to help enhance your nature connection using current scientific thinking. So by taking part you’ll come away with a stronger connection to nature, with all the benefits that brings! Add that to the fun you’ll have at all the other sensory tables plus the exercise you’ll get if you do any of the courses, and hopefully you’ll be feeling absolutely tip-top by the time you leave!

Olfactory sense activity preparation

My Parallel London preparation is in full swing! I’ve been busy designing activities, challenges, and other resources to bring along. It’s a lot of fun doing the research into what plants are great for olfactory stimulation and gathering the bits and bobs I might need. There’s been much rubbing and sniffing of plants, quite a lot of plant buying (yes, I have a problem, I knoooow), online order deliveries, designing, cutting, gluing, potting, head-scratching, and help-seeking! We are making good progress!

Echinacea is a gorgeous plant with a earthy, boggy sort of scent. For a bonus, the flower centers are quite hard and gently spikey, so are great tactile stimulation to boot!
Echinacea is a gorgeous plant with a earthy, boggy sort of scent. For a bonus, the flower centers are quite hard and gently spikey, so are great tactile stimulation to boot!
This stunning bloom is a dahlia called 'Karma Chocolate' and it actually smells like chocolate! The flower heads are quite robust and feel nice to gently cup in your hands. I have to get myself some of these for our garden!
This stunning bloom is a dahlia called ‘Karma Chocolate’ and it actually smells like chocolate! The flower heads are quite robust and feel nice to gently cup in your hands. I have to get myself some of these for our garden!

Nature Sensory Treasure Hunt!

As part of my Parallel London preparation, Joanna has sent me on a Nature Sensory Treasure Hunt! She’s been tweeting me clues to help me find the best plants for sensory stimulation, and the clues have been both easy and difficult! I’ve got a few in the bag, but some I’m struggling with and have been asking for help so if you can help me out, please do so in the comments – I’d be much obliged! So far we’ve had clue’s 1 to 4: auditory experience, olfaction, vestibular stimulation, and gustation. I know there are more to come and I might have my work cut out! Join the fun on Twitter and Facebook to add your suggestions and help me learn about the amazing sensory plants I just know are out there! I’ll write a post about my findings for all the senses when we’ve got good options for each sense.

 

If you’re planning to come to Parallel London, do drop by The Sensory Project Tent and say hi! We’ll be in the personal development zone. Hope to see you there!

How nature improves wellbeing: using the Five Ways to Wellbeing

How nature improves wellbeing and overall health

This is the fourth and final post in my introductory series to how nature improves wellbeing, both mentally and physically. You can read the earlier posts here: part 1, part 2, and part 3. This post explores how nature specifically contributes to wellbeing, when we consider the Five Ways to Wellbeing (see part 3). As before, I’m using The Wildlife Trusts‘ report called Wellbeing benefits from natural environments rich in wildlife as my main reference source.

Using local green space is good to connect us to each other and to our nearby nature.
Using local green space is good to connect us to each other and to our nearby nature.

Connect

Increasingly urban areas with a lack of green space tends to encourage people to stay indoors, discouraging social connection. Green spaces however – whether natural or designed – encourage us to get out and hence interact with others, either by meeting friends or making new ones. Not only does this help the individual, it also helps to develop stronger communities. Group conservation activities in particular contribute to a sense of belonging, improving local social networking and developing a sense of place. These sorts of activities can also encourage social inclusion.

NATURE CONNECTION: From what I’ve read so far, nature connection itself is a huge and developing field of enquiry and warrants at least one blog post of its own from me in due course. Recent research is showing that nature connection is strongly rooted in our emotional involvement with nature and the meaning we find within it (please see the excellent Finding Nature blog from one of the leading experts in this field, Dr Miles Richardson – this post in particular). Nature connection is important for our wellbeing, particularly so for children as it has been shown to improve their hea, life satisfaction and even enhance attainment in subjects such as English (please refer to research by the RSPB)

Be active

Using green spaces for physical activity (getting your active greens!) benefits you physically and mentally. Being able to get outdoors in nature means we’re 40% less likely to become obese, and by choosing a natural environment over an urban one we’re more likely to be more physical even when doing comparable activities. Choosing natural spaces for exercise is likely to reduce stress and improve psychological restoration more so than exercising away from from nature.

If we're active in nature, or exercise in green spare, rather than inside or in an urban environment, we're more likely to do more physical activity and benefit psychologically.
If we choose to be active in nature, exercising in green space rather than inside or in an urban environment, we’re more likely to do more physical activity and benefit psychologically.

Take notice

Mindfulness improves wellbeing, and noticing nature can enhance how mindful you are: the two are linked. Being mindful in nature is thought to improve attention restoration (reducing mental fatigue and improving concentration) by enhancing one’s awareness of experience. Simply viewing nature can manifest many improvements to wellbeing (reduced stress/mental fatigue, enhance rate of recovery from illness – discussed in part 2).

Mindfulness in nature helps restore us mentally, reducing fatigue and stress, and helps us to be more aware of our experiences.
Mindfulness in nature helps restore our mental wellbeing, reducing fatigue and improving concentration, and helps us to be more aware of our experiences.

Keep learning

Using natural environments as a venue for learning activities offers wide-ranging benefits, such as enhanced self-esteem/resilience, and personal, emotional, and social development. Nature-based activities help people learn about their environment whilst gaining new skills and interacting with others, in addition to the aforementioned benefits. In children, learning outdoors develops skills better than in the classroom, and using nature within learning activities enables children to achieve more, both of which enhance wellbeing.

Give

Volunteering for nature-based activities helps to build communities by enabling people to meet and interact, and by providing or caring for community green spaces. Volunteering generally develops skills and so helps personal development, improving self-confidence, but doing so in nature gives high levels of satisfaction and helps us develop more of a sense of self and of place, in addition to the physical exercise often derived during the activity.

Volunteering for nature-based and conservation activities gives high levels of satisfaction and enhances our sense of self and of place. It can strengthen our community by enhancing social networks and providing local green spaces for others.
Volunteering for nature-based and conservation activities improves skills and self-confidence, enhancing our sense of self and of place. It can strengthen our community by enhancing social networks and providing local green spaces for others.

By considering specifically how nature improves wellbeing, using the NEF’s Five Ways to Wellbeing, I think we can all help ourselves to feel better and get more out of life in both the short and long term. We can use these to develop a programme of activities, like you would if you wanted to get fit or lose weight, to boost our overall health and wellbeing in ways science is now showing really work.

Wellbeing through nature, for all the family!